A New Chapter

It’s been almost three years since I last wrote a real long-form blog post (past documentation of LiDAR data aside). Given that, particularly for the last two years, long-form writing has been the bulk of my day job, it’s with a wry smile I wander back to this forlorn medium. How dated it feels, in the age of Twitter and instant 140/280-character gratification! And yet such a reflection of my own mental state, in many ways.

I’ve been working at Gigaclear for about as long – three years – as my absence from blogging; this is no coincidence. My work at BBC R&D was conducted in a sufficiently calm atmosphere to permit me the occasional hobby, and the mental energy to engage with them on fair terms. I spent large chunks of it writing imageboard software; that particular project I consider a success – not only has it been taken on by others technically and organisationally, it’s now hosting almost 2 million images, 10 million comments and has around a quarter of a million users. Not too bad for something I hacked together on long coach journeys and my evenings. I tinkered with drones on the side, building a few and writing software for controlling them.

At Gigaclear – still a startup, at heart – success and survival has demanded my full attention; it is in part a function of working for an organisation that has scaled in the span of three years in staff by over 150%, in live customers by 400%, in built network by 600%. We’ve cycled senior leadership teams almost annually and gone through an investor buyout recently. It is not a calm organisation, and I am lucky (or unlucky, depending on your view) enough to have been close enough to the pointy end of things to feel some of the brunt of it. It has been an incredible few years, but not an easy few years.

I am a workaholic, and presented with an endless stream of work, I find it difficult to move on. The drones have sat idle and gathered dust; my electronics workbench in constant disarray, PCBs scattered. Even for my personal projects, I’ve written barely any code; the largest project I’ve managed lately has been a system to manage a greenhouse heater and temperature sensors (named Boothby), amounting to a few hundred lines of C and Python. My evenings have involved scrawling design diagrams and organisational charts, endless Powerpoint drafts and revisions, hundreds of pages of documentation, too much alcohol, curry, and stress. Given that part of my motivation for moving from R&D to Gigaclear was health (6 hours a day commuting into London was fairly brutal on my mental and physical health) it’s ironic that I’ve barely moved the needle on that front. Clearly, I needed something to allow me to refocus my energy at home away from work, lest work simply consume me.

A friend having a look at the moon in daylight – first light with the new telescope and mount, May 2017

As a kid – back in the late 90s – my father bought a telescope. It was what we could afford – a cheap Celestron branded Newtonian reflector tube on a manual tripod. But it was enough to see Jupiter, Saturn’s rings, and the moon. The tube is still sat in the garage – it was left outside overnight once, wet, in freezing temperatures, and the focuser was damaged in another incident, and it sits idle now, practically unusable. But it is probably part of why today I am so obsessed with space, other than the incredible engineering and beautiful science that goes into the domain. My current bedside reading is a detailed history of the Deep Space Network; a recent book on liquid propellant development is a definite recommendation for those interested in the area. Similar books litter my bookshelves, alongside space operas and books on software and companies.

M31, the Triangulum galaxy

I always felt a bit bad about ruining the telescope (because it was of course me who left it out in the rain) and proposed that for our birthday (my father and I share a birthday, making things much more convenient) we should remedy the lack of a proper telescope in the family; I had been reading various astrophotography subreddits and forums for a while and been astounded by the images terrestrial astrophotographers managed to acquire, so pitched in the bulk of the cash to get an astrophotography-quality mount, the most important bit to spend money on (I had discovered). And so we had a new telescope in the family. Nothing spectacular – a Skywatcher 200mm Newtonian reflector – but on a solid mount, a Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro. Enough to start with a little bit of astrophotography (and get some fabulous visual views on the way).

M81, Bode’s Galaxy

Of course, once one has a telescope, the natural inclination in today’s day and age is to share; and as I shared, I was encouraged to try more. And of course, I then discovered just how expensive astrophotography is as a hobby…

An early shot of Jupiter; I later opted to focus on deep-sky objects

But here it is – a new hobby, and one that I have managed to engage with with aplomb. The images in this post are all mine; they’re not perfect, but I’m proud of them. That I have discovered a love for something that taps directly into my passion for space is perhaps no surprise. Gigaclear is calming down a little as the organisation matures, but making proper time for my hobby has been helpful to settle my own nerves a little.

The scope we bought back in April of 2017; now, in Feb 2019, I think I have what I would consider a “competent” astrophotography rig for deep space objects, albeit only small ones. That particular rabbit hole is worth a few more posts, I think – and therein lies the reason why I have penned this prose.

The Heart Nebula, slightly off-piste due to a mount aiming error

Twitter is a poor medium for detailed discussion of why. Look, here’s this fabulous new filter wheel! Here’s a cool picture of a nebula! But explaining how such things are accomplished, and why I have decided to buy specific things or do particular things and the thought processes around them are not things that Twitter can accommodate. And so, the blog re-emerges.

An early shot of the core of Andromeda, before I had really realised how big Andromeda is and how narrow my field of view was… and before I got a real camera!

I’ve got a fair bit to write about (as my partner will attest to – that I can talk about her publicly is another welcome milestone since my last blog posts) and a blog feels like the right forum for it. And so I will rekindle this strange, isolated world – an entire website for one person, an absurd indulgence – to share my new renewed passion in astrophotography. Hopefully to add to a corpus the parts I feel are missing – the rich documentation of mistakes and errors, as well as celebrations of the successes.

And who knows – maybe that’ll help get my brain back on track, too. Because at the end of the day, working all day long isn’t good for your employer or for your own brain; but if you’re a workaholic, not working takes work!

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